KNUST lecturers grab $100,000 from OWSD for research work

Two female lecturers at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) have been selected as part of the second cohort by the Organization for Women in Science Developing Counties (OWSD).

The lecturers, Dr. Priscilla Kolibea Mante and Dr. Mercy Badu of the Departments of Pharmacology and Chemistry respectively, were selected by OWSD to participate in the Early Career Fellowship Program.

The two scientists among the twenty selected, each received $50,000 to lead various research programmes in KNUST and build up research groups that will attract international visitors.

KNUST in post on their official Facebook page congratulated two lecturers saying: ‘’ Dr. Priscilla Kolibea Mante and Dr. Mercy Badu of the Departments of Pharmacology and Chemistry respectively, have been selected as part of the second cohort by the Organization for Women in Science in Developing Countries (OWSD) Early Career Fellowship Program. These two scientists among the twenty selected, each received $50,000 to lead various research programmes in KNUST and build up research groups that will attract international visitors. Congratulations to our gallant female scientists.’’

OWSD is the first international organization for women scientists from the developing world with the objective of strengthening their role in the development process and promoting their representation in scientific and technological leadership.

The Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD) is an international non-profit organization based at the offices of The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS), in Trieste, Italy, a programme unit of UNESCO. 

OWSD was founded in 1987 and is the first international forum to unite eminent women scientists from the developing and developed worlds with the objective of strengthening their role in the development process and promoting their representation in scientific and technological leadership.

OWSD provides research training, career development and networking opportunities for women scientists throughout the developing world at different stages in their careers.

By: Rashid Obodai Provencal

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